The Right to Wear Powdered Wigs and Use Outhouses

The truth is, I’ve got nothing to blog about. The longer I’ve stayed away from blogging, the harder it’s been to get back into the groove. Not because I’ve been working on some important pursuit, like writing the Great American Novel. Sadly, that’s not why. Continue reading

Mama’s Newspaper Clippings

I’m not here to tell you about Mamá’s letters. No. It’s what she included in her letters that I’ll always remember. Continue reading

I Sing the National Black Anthem

I Sing the National Black Anthem

Meeting diverse people and getting a glimpse into their Meeting diverse people and getting a glimpse into their inner circle can be exhilarating and moving all at once. Which is how I came to discover the National Black Anthem. Continue reading

The Pianist of Willesden Lane Uses Music to Cope with Tragedy of War

The Pianist of Willesden Lane Uses Music to Cope with Tragedy of War

This weekend, I went to the Lyceum and saw “The Pianist of Willesden Lane.” It’s the kind of play that slowly draws you in, exquisitely conjuring up the elegance and artistry of Vienna on the brink of World War II, as well as the heartache and loss of war. I soon found myself riveted by world-renown pianist Mona Golabek and her one-woman show. Continue reading

Tricky Dick Reconsidered

Tricky Dick Reconsidered

Say the name, Richard Milhous Nixon and the words that come to mind are probably these:

Tricky Dick

“I’m not a crook.”

Watergate.

That’s how it’s been for me, and though the Watergate scandal was so named, after the classy hotel where it all began, the “-gate” part of the name has come to signify just about any scandal–Benghazigate, Nipplegate, Bridgegate and so on. Back in the 1990s, there was even a “Monicagate,” and I’m pretty sure you know what that was about. Continue reading